Browse - Most popular shows featuring: cartoon catx






Garfield & FriendsGarfield & Friends
CBS, 1988 Cancelled/Ended | Comedy, Family, Animation
Rating: 4.3/5

Based on the highly popular comic strip by Jim Davis, Garfield and Friends was considered the best long-running cartoon on CBS. This Saturday morning series featured the adventures of that lovable, hungry fat cat Garfield, his yellow dog friend Odie, and their cartoonist bachelor master Jon Arbuckle.


Oggy and the CockroachesOggy and the Cockroaches
Disney, 1999 Cancelled/Ended | Comedy, Family, Action, Animation
Rating: 2.8/5

Oggy would be the happiest of cats if three cockroaches hadn't decided to settle inside his comfortable home.


Sylvester & Tweety MysteriesSylvester & Tweety Mysteries
WB, 1995 Cancelled/Ended | Comedy, Family, Adventure, Crime
Rating: 4/5

With her pets Sylvester the cat and Tweety Bird in tow, good-natured Granny is a globe-trotting, mystery-solving maniac! Unraveling crimes around the world keeps her pretty busy, so it's a good thing Hector the bulldog is around to make sure Sylvester keeps his paws to himself.


Eek! the CatEek! the Cat
FOX, 1992 Cancelled/Ended | Comedy, Family, Adventure, Animation

"Eek! the Cat" is about a chubby purple cat who lives in a cartoon world and his Motto is "It never hurts to help", well sometimes for Eek it does, but he always gets hurt and his adventures spoof many movies and TV shows.


The Twisted Tales of Felix the CatThe Twisted Tales of Felix the Cat
CBS, 1995 Cancelled/Ended | Comedy, Family, Adventure, Fantasy

They say cats have nine lives, and Felix seems to have been no exception. Nearly thirty-five years after his first show, the wonderful, wonderful cat was meowing his way into the 1990's. CBS was so convinced that Felix should be welcomed aboard the Saturday morning lineup that they rushed out 55 five-second bumpers for the 1994 season. Unable to get a whole show out on time, the network was still able to introduce a new audience to the tricky feline by having him appear between established cartoons. But the proud Felix, for whom confidence was never a problem, marched up to the executive in charge of children's programming and demanded his own show. After all, he'd been a star since the 20's. He wasn't going to play second fiddle to a bunch of grungy, slacker 90's toons with no sense of panache. The network gave in.


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