TV Series created by Irwin Allen

Lost in Space (2018)Lost in Space (2018)
Netflix, 2018 | Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi | ► Trailer
Rating: 4.1/5

Stranded light years from their destination, the Robinson family must come together to survive. A drama series based on the 1960s sci-fi classic.


Land of the GiantsLand of the Giants
ABC, 1968 | Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi, Fantasy
Rating: 3/5

Land of the Giants was an hour-long American science fiction television program lasting two seasons beginning on September 22, 1968, and ending on March 22, 1970. The show was created and produced by Irwin Allen. The show was aired on ABC and released by 20th Century Fox Television. The series was filmed entirely in color and ran for 51 episodes. The show starred Gary Conway and Don Marshall. Author Murray Leinster also wrote three novels in 1968 and 1969 based on the television series.


The Time TunnelThe Time Tunnel
ABC, 1966 | Sci-Fi
Rating: 3/5

This one-season show, produced by Irwin Allen, chronicled the adventures of two scientists, Dr. Tony Newman and Dr. Douglas Phillips. Both are working on Project TicToc, a government operation to perfect time travel.


Lost in SpaceLost in Space
CBS, 1965 | Drama, Sci-Fi
Rating: 3.8/5

The space family Robinson is sent on a five-year mission to find a new planet to colonize, but the voyage is sabotaged time and again by an inept stowaway, Dr. Zachary Smith. The family's spaceship, Jupiter II, also carries a friendly robot who endures an endless stream of abuse from Dr. Smith, but is a trusted companion of young Will Robinson.


Voyage to the Bottom of the SeaVoyage to the Bottom of the Sea
ABC, 1964 | Adventure, Sci-Fi
Rating: 4/5

This was the successful TV spin-off of the 1961 movie of the same name. Richard Basehart, as Admiral Nelson, and David Hedison, as Captain Crane commanded the glass-nosed, nuclear-powered Seaview for 110 episodes over four seasons on ABC. The first season, shot in black and white ran for 32 episodes and mixed espionage, the Cold War, and science fiction in a successful blend. The second year went to color and ran 26 episodes. With a big budget and color, plus a re-fitted Seaview and the addition of the classic Flying Sub, the second year was truly epic. A budget cut was sometimes apparent in the 26 episode third year, but good writing still turned out some classic adventures. An increased budget improved the 26 episode fourth year, where Voyage set a record for an American science fiction television program when it hit it's 100th episode. Richard Basehart and David Hedison turned in consistently fine performances, even when confronted with less than sophisticated material.