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The Chicago Code
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The Chicago Code

Originally called Ride-Along, this show is set in Chicago and will follow law enforcement officials away from the police stations and into their cars and see what goes on on the streets.

Show Info

Aired on:
FOX, US
Runtime:
60 min.
Status:
Canceled/Ended
Created by:
Rating:
2.5/5 (4 ratings)
More Info:
Forum | IMDb | TheTVDB
Tools:
Subtitles, Mistakes

Trailer

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Stats

Premiered:
2011
Ended:
2011
Episodes:
13
Watchlists:
904
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Episodes Guide and Summaries

Cast

as Detective Jarek Wysocki
as Teresa Colvin
as Caleb Evers
as Vonda Wysocki
as Isaac Joiner
as Liam Hennessey
as Ronin Gibbons

Popularity

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Latest comments

Post New
by posted
Rwings said:
The questioning behind it is the ratings and demo really aren't bad and in some cases better then shows they did renew, when you take in to the fact that cancelling new shows also lead into more people resenting the channel and the cost of making pilots that don't see the light of day and many other things you'd think they would give shows that have promise more of a chance.


Rwings said:
Now I might not be the normal viewer


That :)

We are not normal viewers. We like quality entertainment, which alone sets us apart from the majority of the TV audience. You are overestimating the impact a cancelled show has on Joe Nobody. We care because we follow the show regularly, we check ratings, we discuss what's happening in the show, what we like, dislike, hope and dread will happen, etc. We feel the cancellation, because these shows are important to us.

To the vast majority of the audience all shows are just something they have on in the background and don't particularly care if they miss an episode. I wouldn't say they don't appreciate good TV, but they don't go out of their way to watch new episodes or even know when they are on. They might notice when The Chicago Code won't be on next season, but you won't get more out of them than a muttered comment about how they enjoyed it last season and then they'll just as happily watch whatever new show FOX puts in front of them and they'll forget all about The Chicago Code.

And as for the new pilots: Networks never cut back an order of new pilots just because they had a full schedule or felt confident about their current line up. For one, this is how they keep the studios that actually make the shows in business - the production of pilots where only 1 or 2 out of 10 actually make it onto TV screens is much more lucrative then producing the shows we actually watch. (Each of the four networks orders about 7 - 10 pilots a season, including the summer season, and that work is distributed among maybe 3 studios, which also produce cable shows.)

Networks are always on the lookout for the new Lost or even better, M*A*S*H, so they always order about the same number of pilots (the amount varies by the quality of the screenplay crop that particular year). Also keep in mind that they order new pilots in the fall when they have 0 idea how well a new show that just premiered does. The pilots are then made and screened and around April is when the networks decide which pilots they order to series and which currently airing shows aren't doing well enough in the ratings that have to make room for the new shows.

This cycle happens every year and there's nothing that will stop it. The chance that a newly commissioned pilot is going to blow up big is always more tempting than trying to nurture a show's weak audience and thus give the show a chance. Add to that the apathy of the general audience and their lack of investment and it's just us who care. (The last show that had any audience investment on a large scale was Lost and since FlashForward couldn't capitalize on it, no one has tried.) For the suits it's all about money and given the fixed cost for the new pilots, the potential of one of them hitting it huge is always a better option than trying to save a show that already "failed" in their eyes.

maccool111 said:
Do they not take into account over-seas sales? To countries where the TV public recognise quality and stick with it.


Unfortunately the overseas sales don't matter until the show's 100th episode when it hits syndication. FlashForward started at the same time in something like 29 countries and it still didn't get a second season, mostly due to the poor US ratings. The Chicago Code started in the UK this or last week I think and will start shortly in Australia, etc. so that is even too little too late, since the decision has been made.

Syndication - the ability to sell the show to secondary broadcasters (like USA, SyFY, etc.) which can re-run it as often as they like - gave Chuck for example its last fifth season which starts in September simply because even though Chuck has miserable ratings the studio will make lots of money in syndication and was able to offer NBC a discount to broadcast it the first time around. Syndication becomes huge when you count in overseas airings, but before syndication the overseas sales are nice, but they cannot get a show off the cancellation list.
by posted
Do they not take into account over-seas sales? To countries where the TV public recognise quality and stick with it.
by posted
marco1475 said:
The reason is perfectly clear and understandable. It's a fallacy to think that studios produce and networks broadcast TV shows to deliver good or quality entertainment. Their only job is to bring in ad revenue, which is determined by the ratings. Low ratings then equal cancelled shows. Quality is not part of the equation.
by posted
Just watched episode 12. Man... why cancel this? :mad:
It's so well written, the acting is good, the Wysocki character is good. It's all very good.
by posted
Just my "luck"... :(
I stopped watching Blue Bloods, and preferred The Chicago Code.
Found it to be better...
by posted
The questioning behind it is the ratings and demo really aren't bad and in some cases better then shows they did renew, when you take in to the fact that cancelling new shows also lead into more people resenting the channel and the cost of making pilots that don't see the light of day and many other things you'd think they would give shows that have promise more of a chance.

I watch 2 shows on NBC after them cancelling things I like I no longer give shows a chance until they have a few seasons, it's the reason I never gave Chase or any of their new shows a chance. ABC I watch 1 show which is Castle that I finally gave a chance last summer after a family member wanted me to download it for them.

Now I might not be the normal viewer but I'm passionate about the shows I watch and I buy the DVD's when they come out in the fall, but I haven't done that recently since my faith in networks is gone. These days Cable is becoming the new go to place since they seem to have a little more faith in there shows.
by posted
Rwings said:
Cancelling this show and Breaking In will I think go with the Firefly in the long list of shows cancelled that I don't think we will ever understand the reason.


The reason is perfectly clear and understandable. It's a fallacy to think that studios produce and networks broadcast TV shows to deliver good or quality entertainment. Their only job is to bring in ad revenue, which is determined by the ratings. Low ratings then equal cancelled shows. Quality is not part of the equation.

I agree that almost all parts of the above are wrong, starting with the studio-network relationship over ad-based revenue business model and ending with the archaic rating system, but it also makes the system very predictable and understandable.

(Btw. the scary part is when you conduct a thought experiment of an ideal world where all viewers of a show would directly fund its continued development (a.k.a. the perfect rating system and delivery medium without the noise of studios, networks, and the Nielsen ratings) and realize that most of our beloved and cancelled shows wouldn't still have enough funding, which would be detrimental to their production values, which in turn would be detrimental to their quality.)
by posted
Cancelling this show and Breaking In will I think go with the Firefly in the long list of shows cancelled that I don't think we will ever understand the reason.
by posted
It's a shame it got canceled , it's a fine show
by posted
ShawnRyanTV Shawn Ryan retweeted by TVbytheNumbers
Ratings for #TheChicagoCode up for the 2nd straight week. #Cruelirony